Tips & tricks
Tips & tricks
Tips from professional photographers #4
Tips from professional photographers #4
Published on by
Paweł Kadysz Paweł Kadysz

Every week we ask professional photographers about their careers, experience, gear and their technique. Every friday we publish tips from three pros.

We ask them one question - What's one piece of advice you wish someone gave you when you were just starting out. These are the answers we get.


Tatiana Mertsalova

Tatiana is an amazingly talented portrait photographer from Russia. She shoots with her Nikon D800. Here's a tiny sample of her work.

© Tatiana Mertsalova
© Tatiana Mertsalova
© Tatiana Mertsalova
© Tatiana Mertsalova
© Tatiana Mertsalova
© Tatiana Mertsalova

For more of Tatiana's beautiful portraits go to her Facebook page and follow her on Instagram. And here's the tip, or actually few tips on how to shoot great portraits.

The most important part in a portrait is to fall in love with the model, otherwise if you will not like the result and it could disappoint you.

For a portrait the place is not particularly important, unless you want to do a series of photos. Then you need to think of an idea, assemble a team, go to the scene of the shooting. You need to know what the model will be wearing. I find most of my models online, but I also take photos of my friends.

To make the model feel good in front of the camera you first need to meet and find common topics to talk abou. You need to make her feel important that she's not just a thing.

As for the lighting, I use a variety of both natural and studio lamps. I love natural, ambient light for its softness. It is much easier to work for newbies. For shooting with natural light I am choosing mostly the evening, as the light is more soft and has a beautiful yellow color. I usually use studio lights for fashion photoshoots.


Alena Haurylik

Alena is a food and still life photographer based in Philadelphia, USA. You must be warned. The images below will instantly make you hungry.

© Alena Haurylik
© Alena Haurylik
© Alena Haurylik
© Alena Haurylik
© Alena Haurylik
© Alena Haurylik

For more Alena's mouth-watering photos be sure to check out her website as well as her Instagram feed. And here's the tip on how to make the food in your photos look delicious.

Food photography may seem to be easy, but it is not. And it took me a while to find out "my own secrets". Here are some of them. The main thing is the light. No good light = no good picture. I never use artificial light, only the ambient daylight. It's especially good on a cloudy day.

Then, there's the angle: I prefer side light, it makes the shadows look soft and real. And finally - the composition. Try to tell the story in one shot, use details. Sometimes they are even more important then the main object. And of course, get as much different tableware and kitchen utensils as possible. Good luck!


Jon Trend

Jon is a self thaught street photographer who couple of years ago was just an amateur like us. He already did photoshoots for companies like Adidas and Gatorade. Check out a sample of his work below.

© Jon Trend
© Jon Trend
© Jon Trend
© Jon Trend
© Jon Trend
© Jon Trend

For more Jon's work from US cities like New York, Portland or Chicago go tho his official website. And for even more cool street photos you might want to follow him on Instagram. And here's what Jon has to say about street photography:

What makes Street Photography so difficult is the fact that your subject and setting is forever changing. You may have the perfect shot one moment, but in a split second that shot can be gone forever. What makes this form of photography so pure is that not one shot is the same, none of these moments can be recreated, ever.

There are a few things you can do to get that “perfect shot”. One, find a background you like and hangout there for a while. You chose your setting, so now it’s just waiting for the perfect subject/subjects to enter the frame. The only downside to this method is it could take days, maybe even weeks to get the right subject. Since you have no control over the general public you have no idea who, what, and when something might happen.

Street photography is a very personal art form. It’s all about how you connect with the world around you. The only way to figure that out is to go out and shoot. If you want to capture the raw emotion of people don’t be afraid to get close to your subject. If your goal is to capture the environment and the people within it don’t be afraid to step back and capture the entire scene. Everything about Street Photography is up to interpretation, and personal perspective. Really, my only advice is to never leave your house without your camera, because you never know when that perfect shot will present itself.


That's it for today. Do you like the idea of this series? Let me know in the comments below. Also - let me know if there's a photographer you'd like to get a piece of advice from, and I'll do my best to get in touch with him/her. Oh! And don't forget to share the article!

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