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Every week we ask professional photographers about their careers, experience, gear and their technique. Every friday we publish tips from three pros.

We ask them one question - What's one piece of advice you wish someone gave you when you were just starting out. These are the answers we get.


Michael Färber

Michael is a young portrait photographer from Germany. He mostly shoots with his Nikon D600 and Nikon lenses. I'm sure you've seen his photos in popular online photography magazines. Here's some of Michael's stunning portraits.

© by Michael Färber
© by Michael Färber
© by Michael Färber
© by Michael Färber
© by Michael Färber
© by Michael Färber

For more of his amazing work visit Michael's Flickr profile. And here's the tip he gave us. I'm sure it'll help you make your portraits better.

To me, one key to perfect portraits is the correlation between the model and the background. The background itself should complement the person in the picture, but never draw away the attention from the subject portrayed.

The model should be a highlighted part of the whole scenery and in the best case somehow be in interaction with the nature around. When I work with a red haired girl for example, I look for flowers or trees that match her hair colour to create a connection between the model and her surroundings.


Hardi Saputra

Hardi is a young photographer from Indonesia, South Kalimantan. If I said I wasn't inspired by Hardi's work, I'd be lying. I love his minimal still life series as well as his lifestyle photography and animated gifs he produces.

© by Hardi Saputra
© by Hardi Saputra
© by Hardi Saputra
© by Hardi Saputra
© by Hardi Saputra
© by Hardi Saputra

For more of Hardi's amazing work visit his tumblr blog and his Instagram account. And if you want to take perfect minimal still life photos - here's a piece of advice from the pro:

Beside keeping the negative space clean from distracting subjects, photographing subject in a form of geometric shapes works really great on minimalist still life pictures.

Shapes can be everything, like square, circle, triangle, or even squiggle. Those simple shapes hopefully will makes your photo looks more simple and minimalist. Still, don’t forget to get creative with your subject shape.

Another tip, just in case if you feel like your photo looks dull because of the negative space, try add a gradient to your photo. You can use brush tool, vignette, or something like that in your photo editor to add a bright and dark side to your photo.


Elke Vogelsang

If you'd like to get a portrait of your pet, Elke from Hildesheim, Germany is the right person. You've probably seen her photography before. Her Pets series was all over the web few months ago. And it's no surprise. Her photos appeared on covers of multiple magazines.

© by Elke Vogelsang
© by Elke Vogelsang
© by Elke Vogelsang
© by Elke Vogelsang
© by Elke Vogelsang
© by Elke Vogelsang

For more of Elke's work visit her Instagram and tumblr. And here's the tip we got from one of the best pet photographer out there:

In order to take an engaging pet portrait that attracts the viewer’s attention you need to find an interesting perspective. Get down on your belly and shoot on at least eye level of your subject or, better yet, even below that.

And I mean it. Don’t even shoot from slightly above the eye level. Lie flat on the ground or use a camera with a tiltable display. This means that the camera might even touch the ground when taking pictures of smaller pets, like cats or small dogs. Furthermore, you can blur out the foreground thus creating a subtle frame.

If you shoot from another perspective, make it an interesting one as well, like from directly above or directly below. Avoid our general human point of view. It’s too common a view and therefore usually not very interesting.


That's it for today. Do you like the idea of this series? Let me know in the comments below. Also - let me know if there's a photographer you'd like to get a piece of advice from, and I'll do my best to get in touch with him/her. Oh! And don't forget to share the article!

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  • Grace

    Thanks for the inspiration Pawel, I think I will look forward to this series 😀 I'd love more tips about night sky photography if you are looking for more ideas

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Pawel from Tookapic

Hi, I’m happy to help you with any tookapic subject, however, before you send me a message, please look at Help section where you can find answers for most questions.

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